DEMOGORGONBrian Lumley
Tor Horror
1987 / 1992

1936- A young Greek by the name of Dimitrios Kastrouni, on the lamb due to a crime of passion, witnesses a rebirth of sorts at the desert ruins of Chorazin, an ancient Middle East town steeped in the supernatural, and rumored cursed by evil. He barely makes it away with his life…
1957- Kastrouni, now on the lamb from the ancient evil that has pursued him since that night 20 years ago, makes a surprise visit to his father on the Greek isle of Larnaca, meaning to take him and the rest of his family into hiding with him for their safety. Only, the evil has already arrived, impregnating three women with its demonic seed, killing Kastrouni’s father and bringing a political and social chaos to Larnaca in its wake. Again, Kastrouni barely escapes with his life…
TODAY (well, 1983 actually…it’s a bit dated)- Charlie Trace, a professional thief, receives a visit from a now-old Kastrouni at his London flat, who tells him of the ancient embodiment of evil before he’s apparently killed by a freakish lightning storm. From there, Trace watches his life tumble down the proverbial crapper as he’s now finding himself dodging assassins and various strange folks, meets up with a mysterious beauty who may or may not be aligned with the evil, and struggles with his own personal belief as the whole conspiracy comes to a head back in the ancient ruins of Chorazin, all because Trace may or may not be the son of the Antichrist. Will he make it out with his life and sanity intact? Will he want to? Good question…

I’ve known Brian Lumley’s work on his ‘Necroscope’ series, a very engaging and interesting take on Vampires and the supernatural. So it was by his name alone that I picked up ‘Demogorgon’ at the used book shop that I peruse once in a while. It’s one of his earlier works, released here in the States after the success of the Necroscope series (the paperback I have has an excerpt from the first book of the series). Lumley is an interesting storyteller…I find his take on the macabre to be unique, especially with the vampires in ‘Necroscope’. Here, science is replaced with Gnostic postulation, plumbing the depths of superstition and dark horror. The epilogue is a nice twist, indeed. Very good read, if you’re looking for something different and engaging…

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