Music Review: AUNT BETTYS - Aunt Bettys

AUNT BETTYS
Aunt Bettys
EastWest Records
1996

Back in 1993, musician / artist Michael Knott, the mastermind behind the highly influential new wave turned alt. rock band L. S. Underground, as well as being a versatile musical renaissance man with his solo albums and various other band projects, created a “general market rock back” called Aunt Bettys Ford. I engage the quotes there, because it was taken from Mike Knott’s Wikipedia entry, and that was used to describe the sound of the band. Mind you, back in the early- to mid-1990s, radio was dominated by alternative music, which made it ubiquitously mainstream, which then lead to the most ironic genre label of the time with “mainstream alternative”. It was a wacky time to be alive, let me tell you.

Anyway, after a bit of a publicized label bidding war which saw the Electra label winning, the self-titled debut release was put out on Electra imprint EastWest Records in 1996 to high critical acclaim…but since it wasn’t promoted properly, it kind of went the way of a wet fart while walking down the street: hardly anyone noticed, and it disappeared fast enough for anyone to care. Which is a pity, as this release really is a hidden gem amongst the glut of modern rock that was being foisted upon our earholes back then.

This might come as a surprise to those who only know me as the die-hard \,,/METAL\,,/head, but I know good music when I hear it, and for me to say that I think that Aunt Bettys Ford is a good, solid collection of rock in the alternative vein shouldn’t be very shocking.

If there’s one thing Michael Knott knows how to do, it’s writing a good guitar-driven rock tune with very smart lyrics and catchy hooks, and imbuing the songs with a unique personality. The album starts off solid with the track “Jesus”, which blends together the use of acoustic and electric guitars rather well, and snags us with the hookiest hook and keeps us through most of the album. Nearly every song on here is a good one, from the giggle-inducing “Mother Trucker”, to the redux of Knott’s previous solo tune “Rocket And A Bomb”, to the rollicking closer “Rock And Roll” (not a Led Zepplin cover, in case you’re wondering). There’s maybe two songs that I wasn’t too impressed with; “Jane”, which wasn’t bad, but just didn’t do it for me, and “Double” which is a WGWAG cut with some interesting percussion touches.

Overall, though, Aunt Bettys is a good solid rock n’ roll album from one of the more criminally underrated artists in music, Christian, mainstream or otherwise. Recommended.

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