UNCLE NECRO WATCHES: The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature

Leave a comment

UNCLE NECRO WATCHES

nut job 2

I just took in a showing of The Nut Job 2 with my nephews during a Fun Day type weekend I had with them (they’re growing up so fast…cue “Cats In The Cradle”), and instead of writing out a review of the movie (as I normally do), I thought I’d record my thoughts on it during my drive back to the Haunted Victorian after dropping them off. Here’s the result, for better or for worse:

Does this mean more Uncle NecRo Watches… type mini podcasts like this in the future? Eh, depends on my mood, I guess…or how much of a response these give. I mean, who doesn’t have movie review vlogs and podcasts and such. Cheers, all.
::END TRANSMISSION::
necrosarx@gmail.com

Advertisements

Movie Review: LIFE

Leave a comment

lifeColumbia Pictures
2017
R

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station are on the cutting edge of one of the most important discoveries in human history: the first evidence of extraterrestrial life on Mars. As members of the crew conduct their research, the rapidly evolving life-form proves far more intelligent and terrifying than anyone could have imagined.

I grew up being a space science nerd at a very young age. I remember being fascinated with space and space travel since before Kindergarten. My parents maintained an ongoing subscription to Discover magazine for several years for me (it had the most pictures and stuff), as well as encouraged me to learn more about this area of study as much as they could. Of course, this just fed into my growing love of the science fiction genre, especially with movies. Which is to say, sooner or later it was inevitable that I would get around to watching the latest Alien rip-off, Life.

Okay okay okay, maybe “rip-off” is the wrong word to use, here. I mean, on the surface, the premise of Life (which, sadly, does not involve shots of the nummy cereal food) seems pretty similar, with some modifications: a bunch of scientists on the International Space Station discovers microscopic life within a soil sample taken from a Mars expedition, they manage to revive said life and watch in fascination as the space amoeba grows from microscopic to a CGI blob-ish thing. Eventually, one of the scientists decides to zap the alien blob because science, which annoys the blob–which was named Calvin by the scientists, by the way, like how you name a goldfish–leading to it somehow kicking the butt of the scientist and escaping its enclosure, and managing to kill a couple other scientists before getting out of the lab. Also, whenever Calvin eats something, it (he?) gets bigger. Naturally. Soon, the surviving scientists find themselves trying their darndest to survive and not get eaten, while the damage to the space station mounts along with the body count. Soon, it’s down to two remaining scientists, who hatch a plan to lure Calvin into one of the escape pods and blast him back out into deep space. Only, this involves one of the scientists to be inside with Calvin and manually override the preset controls to get it to not land on earth, while the other scientist escapes on the other pod to get back to Earth and warn everyone of a potential threat. We then end on a twist that everyone saw coming the moment the solution was mentioned. The end.

Life, as a science fiction movie, is fine. It’s well-shot, well acted and manages to get some effective claustrophobic thrills out of a story that is rather cookie-cutter. Again, I refer back to the comparisons to the movie Alien that everyone seemed to be making, and there’s some point to that; after watching Life, I personally like to think that this was more a prequel to the movie The Blob, mainly due to how Calvin ate and metabolized everything. And while we’re on the topic of Calvin, I have to say that the “monster Calvin” effects were kind of…off. He came off as kind of an underwater fern thing rather than a space monster. But, in the end, while I saw the ending coming, I was pleased with the standard dun-dun-duuuuun ending they went with.

Overall, I get the nagging feeling that Life would have worked better as an episode of the revival-era Outer Limits television show, rather than a full-length movie. The movie does try to get that hard sci-fi cred with how they approach the science part of the fiction; by the time the ending credits roll, though, I wasn’t really craving more beyond that. Worth a rental, at least.

Movie Review: GET OUT

1 Comment

get outUniversal Pictures
2017
R

“I want your eyes, man, I want those things you see through.”

Now that Chris and his girlfriend, Rose, have reached the meet-the-parents milestone of dating, she invites him for a weekend getaway upstate with Missy and Dean. At first, Chris reads the family’s overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter’s interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he never could have imagined.

I have to once again say, 2017 is turning out to be a rather good year for horror movies. There has been a bunch that have eschewed the usual conventions of the PG-13 teenybopper horror flicks that have glutted the big screen in the past ten years (you know what they are, I don’t think I have to point them out) and produced some very smart, very effective actual horror that hits you square in the psychological soft spots.

So, with that bit out of the way, I bring you my take on the movie Get Out. This has been toted as a modern horror masterpiece, a new type of horror some are calling Social Justice Horror. Or something like that. I’ve heard that bandied about a couple of times. I’m not what you would call a passionate zealot when it comes to political issues; on the other hand, I do appreciate a well-executed bit of subversive commentary within the horror movies I watch. The operative word here would be “well-executed”, mind you. I’ve seen more than my share of movies where it’s obvious the message was more important than making a quality horror movie.

Get Out manages to hit that balance between effective psychological horror movie and social commentary. I know this because I enjoyed this movie immensely without once having my intelligence insulted. And that would have been far too easy to do, and the fact that he pulled it off speaks volumes of the talent that is Jordan Peele with this being his first movie directing.

The best way I would describe Get Out was if David Cronenberg decided to do a remake of Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (the good one with Sidney Poitier) while having it produced by Alfred Hitchcock in his prime: A young black man who is an up-and-coming photographer of note is being introduced to his Caucasian girlfriend’s family, who kind of go out of their way making him feel welcome and he’s safe because they’re just oh, so NOT racist or anything. Right. During their stay, he meets his girlfriend’s family’s many friends and acquaintances, all of which marvel at what a fine specimen this young man is. Also, they’re totally not racist or anything. They cool wit’ the struggle. They’ve watched In Living Color back in the day and stuff. Did I just date myself? I believe I just did. Anyway, all of this starts getting to the young man, and he decides that he’s going to cut the trip short, only…

Yeah, if I go any further, I’ll be doing those of you who haven’t seen Get Out a major disservice. Mind you, I only tend to give away the endings of bad movies, and Get Out is very much NOT a bad movie. As a matter of fact, it is a very, very good horror thriller movie that is well-written, well-filmed and edited, with some fantastic performances from the cast. For this being Jordan Peele’s first movie, let alone a horror movie, after watching this, I cannot wait to see what else he has for us in the cinematic sense. My only regret is not catching this in the theater when it was out. Highly recommended.

Movie Review: The INVITATION

1 Comment

the invitationDrafthouse Films
2015
NR

“I’m so glad you’re here. We have a lot to talk about. So much to say tonight.”

While attending a dinner party at his former house, a man starts to believe that his ex-wife and her new husband have sinister plans for the guests.

The Invitation was one of those movies that I heard getting quite the buzz around the independent movie circuit, getting rather positive reviews from the regular horror movie blogs and websites I frequented. It was described not as your standard horror movie, nothing supernatural, and also not one of the many type of siege and home invasion type horror movies that have come out in the past few years. It took me a bit to get around to watching this for myself, but finally the chance happened for me to do so.

In the movie, this young couple are on their way to a dinner party that, as we find out, is being thrown by the guy’s ex-wife and her new husband. So, already we’re being thrown into the awkwardness right off the bat. Lovely. Then they hit a coyote along the way. Of course, the two don’t seem to take this as an ominous sign, so they make it to the house, which also happens to be the house the guy and his ex-wife used to live in, until the tragedy that tore them apart happened. So, yeah. Unpleasant memories on top of seeing the woman you used to love intensely be happy with someone else, inside of the house you two used to…you know what, let’s just move forward, shall we? When they arrive, they meet several of the other guest that are there, including that of a young lady that the ex-wife and new husband decided to have live with them after meeting her at a spa retreat in Mexico. As they all chat and such, the tensions rise as memories come flooding back to the young man, and he begins to suspect something sinister is afoot, as everyone’s a little too friendly…and also his ex’s husband has locked all the doors. Then they’re all shown a kind of infomercial recruiting video for that “spa” in Mexico that is totally not a cult that, as it turns out, the ex-wife went to not too long ago to help deal with the tragedy of her son’s death on his 10th birthday. The reaction to this is what you would expect, though not as harsh as if they were being pitched AmWay. They continue on with the dinner and socializing, as the young man grows a bit more paranoid as the night wears on. Everyone assures him that everything is all right…up until the time when he realizes he was correct all along.

I have to give this film credit: I had no idea what kind of movie I was going to be watching going into this. I wasn’t even certain while I was watching the movie itself, as it did a really good job at keeping things close to the chest and just letting the story unfold slowly and letting you try and think things through. This movie is intense, and in that slow-burn, tension mounting, something just isn’t right kind of vibe that builds up to a bursting point, and when it does burst it’s quite effective. All of the actors were great, giving fantastic performances and really pushing forth the genuine sense of tension and uncomfortable atmosphere. The film is rather claustrophobic, as it’s mostly set inside of a house (with some scenes outside of the house briefly), and overall, when it came to the twist ending, leading up to it I was still uncertain if it was going to be the one that I thought it would be. Turns out, it is, but I’m not going to say what it is.

Overall, The Invitation turned out to be much, much better than I expected, with a completely fleshed out cast of characters, some very powerful performances, and a thick atmosphere of claustrophobia and paranoia that leads to a very satisfying ending. Highly recommended.

Newer Entries