Vinyl Confessions: BUYING BACK MY CHILDHOOD, Pt. 1

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So, one of the objectives I have when I dived back into collecting vinyl records was to try and get back some of my favorites that I may not have originally owned on that format, but were integral in shaping my personal soundtrack growing up. So far, it’s been fun running into some of these bits…
duran duran notorious
DURAN DURAN – Notorious
Not my favorite Duran Duran album, but still something I nabbed when I saw it at Half Price Books. The title track skips right at the beginning, which sucks…
nugent, ted - double live gonzo
TED NUGENT – Double Live Gonzo
It’s one of the albums that my Uncle Jerry gave me when he heard me listening to Wham. It’s one of the two gateway albums that he gave me that got me into hard rock and metal in the first place. Which is the main reason why I have this in the first place. Otherwise, not really a fan of the Nuge’s music outside of the radio hits…
run dmc - raisin hell
RUN-D.M.C. – Raisin’ Hell
Bought it as a nerdy 13-year-old white kid because of their cover of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way”; discovered that this is a solid album front-to-back. Still one of my favorites…
bon jovi - slippery when wet
BON JOVI – Slippery When Wet
I once overheard a teenage coworker years ago proclaim–out loud–that Bon Jovi was the Nickelback of the 80s. I immediately chucked several sharp objects at him. Slippery When Wet may be their only album that I can still listen to front-to-back (with their follow-up New Jersey coming a close second) in public and not be ashamed of doing so. It’s also one of the very few good memories I have of my Junior High years. That, and the Run-D.M.C. record…

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Uncle NecRo’s TOP 100 CHRISTIAN ALBUMS FROM THE 90s, Part 2 (80-61)

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Hey everybody, I’m back now with Part 2 of the Top 100 Christian Albums from the 1990s. If you missed it, Part 1 is right here. Now, without further adeu, here are picks numbers 80 through 61:

chagall-guevara80 – Chagall Guevara (Chagall Guevara)
…that one time that Steve Taylor fronted an actual band that was pretty good, but nobody noticed because it was 1991 and they weren’t from Seattle. Bummer, that.

77s-pray-naked79 – Pray Naked (The 77s)
…as alternative music goes, this one’s pretty good, but let’s face it: any band that can make the American Evangelical communities flip their collective lids over a title that encourages the listener to come before God with no pretensions, transparent and vulnerable has a place in my collection, regardless of the genre.

aunt-bettys-aunt-bettys78 – Aunt Bettys (Aunt Bettys)
…speaking of artists that consistently manages to piss off the American Christian subculture without even trying to do so, I present you Michael Knott’s woefully underrated side project, Aunt Bettys. ‘Nuff said.

scaterd-few-sin-disease77 – Sin Disease (Scaterd-Few)
…sorry to say that I was a bit late in the game in appreciating this particular album. It’s a classic, yes, and one of those albums that was controversial for many reasons, but mostly because they weren’t safe like certain other so-called “Christian punk” bands at the time. Incidentally, “Kill The Sarx” is where I got the inspiration for my online persona, The NecRoSarX. Now you know.

holy-soldier-last-train76 – Last Train (Holy Soldier)
…a bit more bluesy, quite a bit more mature than the first released. Kind of like Cinderella’s second release after Night Songs. You get the idea. I hope.

fear-not-fear-not75 – Fear Not (Fear Not)
…what is essentially the former Blonde Vinyl band Love Life, given the ol’ Elefante slick production makeover. Big, bombastic 80s hair rock, and a guilty pleasure indeed.

scaterd-few-jawboneofanass74 – Jawbonofanass (Scaterd-Few)
…this may seem like blasphemy, but I actually prefer Jawboneofanass over Sin Disease. I don’t know why, other than it flows a bit better, maybe? Is that pretentious-sounding enough?

deitiphobia-clean73 – Clean (Deitiphobia)
…contrary to popular belief, there was an underground contingent of Christians producing industrial back in the 1980s, but they mostly didn’t get noticed until around the time Trent Reznor showed up. Or something like that. Anyway, this is a good album.

dead-artist-syndrome-devils-angels-saints72 – Devils, Angels & Saints (Dead Artist Syndrome)
…”gothic rock”, “post-punk”, “gloom rock”, whatever, sometimes you gotta throw this one on with the lights off and stare at the wall.

bride-drop71 – Drop (Bride)
…stylistically different than the previous two heavier releases, more of a throwback to the Kinetic Faith release yet more mature than that one.

dig-hay-zoose-magentamantalovetree70 – MagentaMantaLoveTree (Dig Hay Zoose)
…released back when the word “Alternative” was thrown around like a brand name, this release saw Dig Hay Zoose as the spiritual successors to scaterd-few. Too bad it was to be their final studio release.

deitiphobia-lo-fi-vs-sci-fi69 – Lo:Fi Vs. Sci:Fi (Deitiphobia)
…a electronic industrial sci-fi concept album. Enough said.

lsu-this-is-the-healing68 – This Is The Healing (L. S. U.)
…dark, introspective, with an underlying twisted sense of humor. Probably one of the first instances of discovering it was okay not to be a shiny-happy Christian.

dead-artist-syndrome-happy-hour67 – Happy Hour (Dead Artist Syndrome)
…this was sold in Christian bookstores. It started with a song called “Young Sexy & Dead” (sure, it was listed as “Y.S.D” on the CD, but still), and has another song referencing the Church body as a psychotic knife-wielding back-stabber. That’s called “irony”, folks. Delicious irony.

bride-kinetic-faith66 – Kinetic Faith (Bride)
…hard rock with a southern twinge, and a total 180 from the hair metal they played previously.

zao-the-splinter-shards-the-birth-of-separation65 – The Splinter Shards The Birth Of Separation (Zao)
…at the time of this release, good quality metal was hard to come by, especially in the so-called Christian market. This had to due until some came around.

crashdog-cashists-facists-other-fungus64 – Cashists, Fascists, & Other Fungus (Crashdog)
…one of my favorite punk albums, it has all the hallmarks: raw, crusty, and probably the first instance of outspoken Christians protesting the G. O. P.

12th-tribe-livin-in-babylon63 – Livin’ In Babylon (12th Tribe)
…Run DMC style rapping paired with some metal riffs provided by Jimmy P. Brown of Deliverance? Yes, please.

index62 – Blood (Red Sea)
…a collaboration between the guitarist from Fear Not and the vocalist from Die Happy, and it’s a monster of a bluesy metal rock album.

wedding-party-anthms61 – Anthems (Wedding Party)
…basically Saviour Machine with all the beautiful richness without all the unnecessary pretentiousness. And a better singer.

HALLOWEEN’ING 2016: Day 26 – A Nightmare On My Street

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“A NIGHTMARE ON MY STREET”

D. J. Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince

Before he was an “actor” starring in “movies”, Will Smith was a “rapper” that went by the moniker The Fresh Prince, because it was the 80s. Along with his cohort D. J. Jazzy Jeff, he released the album He’s The DJ, I’m The Rapper in 1988, which featured as its first track a curious little exorcise in copyright infringement titled “A Nightmare On My Street”.

To be fair, “A Nightmare On My Street” was entered for consideration to be included in the soundtrack for the fourth installment of the Nightmare series, The Dream Master…but that was turned down in favor of the much more tasteful “Are You Ready For Freddy” by The Fat Boys [/sarcasm].

As a choice for inclusion in any Halloween mix, “A Nightmare On My Street” is a no-brainer, really. It’s campy as only The Fresh Prince can do, telling the tale of his own wacky encounter with Freddy, with a chilling ending that, if taken in contextual reality, can only mean that the Jazzy Jeff (D. J. or otherwise) since then was a reanimated corpse brought back by means of voodoo to keep kicking out those jams at an 87% efficiency level.

Note: The version that appears on the original LP and cassette releases are over 6 minutes, while the CD and single versions are only 4 minutes 53 seconds long. This is because CD technology back then sucked, and could only hold a truncated version of the song. Try and find the original 6 minute version, if you’re so inclined.

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