Uncle NecRo’s TOP 10 FAVORITE USE OF POP MUSIC IN MOVIES

Leave a comment

NecRoSarX Chronicles Header

Just in case you haven’t noticed the pattern, I loves me some movies. I also loves me some musics to listen to. And one thing that Hollywood enjoys is to put some decent pop music in some movies, like injecting the creme filling inside a nummy donut. And now that I’m completely jonsing for a creme filled donut, I’m just going to say that I decided to rip off another article involving the best pop songs used in Comic Book movies, only mine is going to be about the best pop music used in regular movies I’ve seen. So, while I go out on a quest to find the elusive pastry of craving banishment, with creme filling of white, and sprinkles the color of the rainbow, here is my list of my

TOP 10 FAVORITE USE OF POP MUSIC IN MOVIES
(in no particular order, mind you)

The Song: “Rock You Like A Hurricane” (The Scorpions)
The Movie: Little Nicky
Don’t get me wrong, this movie is horrible. A great premise, but ruined by Adam Sandler’s juvenile style of “comedy”. But, there are shiny moments, such as the very brief few seconds where one of the three sons of the Devil, Adrian, makes an entrance near the end of the movie for the big showdown, all to the opening metal riff of The Scorpion’s “Rock You Like A Hurricane”. If only that would start playing every time I enter a room…

The Song: “Can’t Smile Without You” (Barry Manilow)
The Movie: Hellboy II: the Golden Army
I love Guillermo del Toro. I love his Hellboy movies. And I love the fact that del Toro has a sense of humor mixed in with his dark and twisted imagination. Which is why I always love the scene in this sequel where both Hellboy and Abe Sapien get drunk and have this 1970s MOR power ballad cheeseball blasting while pining for their respective loves…

The Song: “Time In A Bottle” (Jim Croce)
The Movie: X-Men: Days Of Future Past
Not a fan of the song, but the use of it during perhaps the best scene in a movie filled with memorable scenes as contrasting to Quicksilver’s rushing around super fast and messing with everything was bloody brilliant…

The Song: “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Queen)
The Movie: Wayne’s World
Most of you whipper-snappers would only recognize this classic due to it being shoehorned into the Suicide Squad movie. But, the best use of the song would be 25 years prior, when it was used in an iconic scene in the classic Wayne’s World movie early on….

The Song: “Shoop” (Salt-N-Pepa)
The Movie: Deadpool
Of course Deadpool would be a fan of Salt-N-Pepa. I’m glad they kept it in the movie, as it was with the test footage to try and get the movie made initially. It does much to establish ‘Pool’s personality…

The Song: “Welcome To The Jungle” (Guns N’ Roses)
The Movie: Lean On Me
I watched this movie when it was first released in theaters back in 1989. Being a big Gn’R fan at the time, I did not expect this song to be played at the beginning while showing scenes of the high school being a teenage warzone. The movie became my instant favorite right then and there…

The Song: “The Four Horsemen” (Metallica)
The Movie: X-Men: Apocalypse
And speaking of using metal classics in movies, the usage of the bangover-inducing “The Four Horsemen” not only made sense thematically (given that it was used while Apocalypse was gathering together his own “four horsemen”), but it gave an otherwise mediocre X-Men movie a moment of awesome that ended all too soon…

The Song: “Institutionalized” (Suicidal Tendencies)
The Movie: “Iron Man”
Yes, I realize there may have been other more popular songs that were used for the soundtrack; and while I loves me some AC/DC, I was hyped up when I heard the strains of this classic Suicidal Tendencies tune being cranked in Tony’s garage. All he wanted was a Pepsi, after all…

The Song: “Tainted Love” (Soft Cell)
The Movie: Coneheads
It’s fascinating how ubiquitous a song becomes after hearing it for the first time. Which is what happened when I first heard the Soft Cell hit cover of “Tainted Love”, as the very first place I immediately heard it again was when I watched the greatly underrated Coneheads. Not only do we hear it on a radio in one scene, but is sung while battling an alien monster with golf. I’m not making that part up.

The Song: “Afternoon Delight” (The Starland Vocal Band)
The Movie: PCU
To quote Homer Simpson: “Starland Vocal Band? They SUCK!” And nothing is worse than having this nauseating bit of 70s adult contemporary schmaltz come on and not being able to escape its sound crawling up inside and defiling your earholes. Which is exactly what happens in this Animal House in the 1990s ripoff comedy, as the protagonist(?) puts the song on the CD player on infinite repeat, then locks all of the stuffy Republicans in the room with it cranking. Wackiness ensues.

::END TRANSMISSION::

Advertisements

March 25, 2017

Leave a comment

NecRoSarX Chronicles Header

inside my headWhen it comes to the mental part of writing (which happens all the time; the physical writing part is maybe 10 percent of the process), one of the more effective ways of getting past writer’s block is to put some \,,/METAL\,,/ on and let my mind wander amidst the soundtrack drowning out the outside world. Sitting with big over-the-ears headphones, staring out to the distance is good, but the most effective use of this is driving around in the NEKRON-7, something cranking on the stereo, somehow the added busywork of driving combined with the music really brings out some fantastic brain droppings.

The trick is to translate what’s dancing around in my head onto the blank pages here in our dimension. And sometimes that translation process gets lost in the ether, resulting in something close to approximation of what I saw in my head, but not quite.

I am my own worst critic when it comes to my writing. I always have been, and always will be. Until the day I stop writing, I’ll keep trying. It’s the only way I can calm the voices, after all. That, and the \,,/METAL\,,/. Cheers.

Leave a comment

Well, here we are. The end of another year. And as a year, overall, I think it’s safe to say that the majority opinion is that the year of our Lord Twenty-Sixteen SUCKED on so many levels, I’m pretty sure its effects can be felt on alternate dimensions and frequencies. Yes, there were a lot of celebrity deaths this year; however, this being a personal bligity-blog of mine, I’m not going to focus on all of those (though I really could, there have been many childhood favorites that have fallen this year). Instead, to at least make an acknowledgment of the ones that have been an inspiration to me, I’m going to pepper this post with YouTube clips of some favorites of mine while I wax nostalgic for the past year. However ugly it was.

First, I would be remiss if I didn’t start off with perhaps one of the biggest losses my family had this year: In the very first week of June, my Grandmother Betty Strand passed away. She was always a constant anchor in my life, as she was a strong, tenacious and lively cornerstone of the family, raising three children on the farm and being active in the community and such. Her loss has left a void in the lives of many.

And as long as we’re on the subject, along with Grandma, two Great Aunts also passed away this year: Aunt Janice and Aunt Muriel. Aunt Janice was Grandma’s younger sister, and was also a presence in the family growing up. Aunt Muriel was Grandpa Strand’s sister, and was another presence in the family growing up. We have a big family, and for better or for worse, we’re still pretty tight as a unit. I’m thankful for that, and thankful for having known them.

In July, there was a massive shakeup at the church I was attending. I really don’t want to go into the details (as we’re still healing and moving on), but suffice to say, there was a split. And after much deliberation, I decided to go with the ones who left, in helping to be a part of the healing and moving on. A new church was birthed out of what essentially started as a Sunday morning therapy group for those who were hurt from the split. Fortunately, this wasn’t formed out of spite, but out of a genuine desire to continue to serve God and Christ Jesus despite of the circumstances. Almost immediately, we’ve been seeing the Holy Spirit work with us to that end. In case you’re morbidly curious, here’s the website to peruse.

Of course, no year-end blog post would be complete without mentioning all the wackiness that happened in the culture. And this was probably the wackiest of the wacky. As in, the world just threw up its collective hands and went, “Okay, we all go crazy, now.” Besides all the celebrity deaths (which, as of this writing, still hasn’t stopped, it seems), who could forget the year-long freak show that was this round of Presidential elections? To quote one of the best parts of the movie Resivuar Dogs, “Clowns to the left of me, Jokers to the right”. On the left of the Presidential ring, the Senator wife of a former President. To the right, a business mogul/former reality show producer-star/comb-over enthusiast with little to no political experience whatsoever. After months and months of mud-flinging, passive-aggressive public whining, really bad ideas and desperate character assassinations (among other things), at the end of the day, it turned out that we all collectively stepped in some Trumpy-Dumpy. Gads, that episode of MST3K is so endlessly quotable. And given the fallout and the various updates on how Trump is lining up his next four years…yeah, this might make 2016 seem like the Golden Years in comparison. We shall see, as always. The road to Idiocracy stretches out ever before us. Still, I’m trying to figure out why so many of my fellow professing Christians seemed to treat his election as the next best thing to the Second Coming of Jesus.

And lest the Presidential elections overshadow the other bits of wackiness of the year: Britan decided to leave the European Union, citing “It’s not you, it’s me” and further stating “We can still be friends, though,” before deleting them from their Facebook lists; a cartoon frog is now declared a “hate symbol” because…reasons, I guess; the President of the Philippines threatened to burn down the UN; for several months, the entire country freaked out over clowns (well, moreso than usual); and last but certainly not least, there was that Dakota Access Pipeline protest that got rather ugly before an agreement could be made, only to have the protester’s point made for them by the pipeline itself. Delicious irony.

Okay, on to some more pleasant stuff. For all the downers, at least there were some really really good \,,/METAL\,,/ that was released: Megadeth came back in form with Dystopia in January, and then Anthrax released the melodic-yet-heavy For All Kings in February. Babymetal released Metal Resistance in March, which was more of the mutated J-Pop/Metal hybrid I somehow find irresistible. Death Requisite released some rather good death metal with their Revisitation release, while I found myself disappointed with the debut release from Becoming Saints, Oh The Suffering. Ricky Puckett unleashed his In Darkest Dreams project with The Vanishing, a much-needed injection of dark and brutal for my earholes. And then Hell apparently froze over, as Klayton dropped a surprise brand-new Circle Of Dust album, Machines Of Our Disgrace. And finally*, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Metallica releasing Hardwired…To Self-Destruct, which turned out to be quite decent.

On the movie front, this year started off strong with the most excellent Deadpool. The year had some decent ones, like 10 Cloverfield Lane (a lot better than what I expected), the new Ghostbusters, the Magnificent Seven remake, the Pete’s Dragon remake, Suicide Squad (surprisingly decent), and Fantastic Beasts & Where To Find Them (sorry, no review posted yet). The rather good movies this year were Captain America: Civil War, Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children, Star Trek Beyond, Doctor Strange, and of course, the year’s capper, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Of course, there were some stinkers in this year’s mix, which for me were Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice, Independence Day: Resurgence, and the surprisingly “meh” X-Men: Apocalypse.

And last, but certainly not least, in the more happier aspects of my personal life this year: This last Spring both my Nephew/Godson Christoper Rinas and one of my cousin’s eldest son Trevor Donahey graduated High School. Gads, I’m old.

So, that’s my year in a nutshell. To quote from one of my favorite episodes of M*A*S*H: “Here’s to the new year. May it be a damn sight better than the last one, and may we all go home before it’s over.”** Take that as you will. Whatever you do, celebrate heartily, but also somberly. Don’t be stupid. Me, I’m going to be doing my yearly Haunted New Years horror movie marathon whilst deciding what part of the clutter in my domicile is going to get the heave-ho. And there may be a bacon pizza in the mix, somewhere. Until next year (see what I did there?), I remain your humble servant Uncle NecRo. God bless, my wonderful freaks.

::END TRANSMISSION::

*– While I did review the new Klank album, the official release isn’t until January 13th, so that’s actually one to look forward to.

**– Season 9, Episode 6: “A War For All Seasons”

Uncle NecRo’s TOP 100 CHRISTIAN ALBUMS FROM THE 1990s, Part 1: 100-81

2 Comments

So, some time ago, I came across a bunch of lists that the members of one of the Facebook Pages that I am a member of were doing. Namely, they were listing their top 100 favorite albums by Christian bands and artists that were released in the 1990s. I thought I would go ahead and write out my own list; the thing was, I was also in the middle of organizing and uploading the posts for the entirety of October, all of the Halloween’ing articles, and put the list on the back-burner to focus on getting all of that taken care of. I went back to it, and…well, I decided to not post it in the group itself, but instead share the outcome with everyone, along with some blurbs on the ones I picked.

Before I share, I want to point out that I had a couple of ground rules: 1) no live albums, and 2) no greatest hits type albums. Also, this list developed from the top down, as I thought of them, with very little messing with the final lineup. This is all as they came to me, so they’re in no particular order per se. So, now, without further adieu, here is my list:

carman-addicted-to-jesus100 – Addicted To Jesus (Carman)
…yes, I actually owned this one, way back in the day. It still remains a bit of a guilty pleasure, really. Especially with “Satan, Bite The Dust” on here. Pure, delicious sanctified cheese.

petra-beyond-belief99 – Beyond Belief (Petra)
…’tis the only 90s-era release of Petra’s that I don’t find myself flinching at too much while listening to. Also, that riff on “Seen And Not Heard” that everyone knew was a rip-off of the riff from the KISS song “Heaven’s On Fire” but couldn’t admit to in public circles because that would be admitting to knowing what a KISS song is.

adventures-of-the-o-c-supertones98 – Adventures Of The O. C. Supertones (The O. C. Supertones)
…there was a brief time in the mid-1990s where everyone claimed to like ska. Well, the so-called “third wave” ska that seemed to pop up like a rash after using the public pool. I’m afraid this wormed its way into my collection due to peer pressure. This album is the equivalent of that one person you know that tries so very hard to get you to be as bubbly happy as they are, you can’t help but want to kick puppies into traffic. Good production, though.

dc-talk-jesus-freak97 – Jesus Freak (DC Talk)
…there was also a time in the 1990s where there was a list of albums you needed to own, otherwise your sincerity of claiming to be a Christian was called into question. This was one of those albums. The thing is…this still holds up.

bloodgood-all-stand-together96 – All Stand Together (Bloodgood)
…it’s a pity that the majority of the good Bloodgood albums were released in the 1980s, because they needed to at least be represented. This particular album, unfortunately, is not that great. But, it’s on here in hopes to get someone to check out their previous releases before this one.

third-day-third-day95 – Third Day (Third Day)
…remember what I said about Jesus Freak being one of those albums you needed to have in your possession to justify your Christian existence? This was also one of these albums. That’s all I’m gonna say about this.

miss-angie-100-million-eyeballs94 – 100 Million Eyeballs (Miss Angie)
…would you believe I got this after seeing the video she did for “Lift”, because I developed a bit of a fanboy crush on her voice and style. The album is pretty good, too, kind of a Veruca Salt vibe to it.

grammatrain-lonely-house-cover93 – Lonely House (Grammatrain)
…one of the actual decent releases from the glut of Grunge music that came out two years after Grunge died out in the mainstream. That’s the usual gestration period for a genre to be co-opted by the CCM market.

mike-knott-strip-cycle92 – Strip Cycle (Michael Knott)
…I like to pop this one on after someone claims they only listen to acoustic singer-songwriter music. Nine times out of ten, their heads explode. I also like to que up “Rock Stars On H” when the youth group is stuck inside the NEKRON 7 with me just to hear the uncomfortable silence.

galactic-cowboys-space-in-your-face91 – Space In Your Face (Galactic Cowboys)
…look, I agree that this should be quite a bit higher, had this been an actual ranking-of-the-worst-to-best list, but as I mentioned in the intro (in case you skipped it directly to the list, like I usually do with posts like these), this was thrown together as they came to mind. And this is my favorite of the Galactic Cowboys discography.

swirling-eddies-sacred-cows90 – Sacred Cows (The Swirling Eddies)
…finally. Proper renditions of Christian favorites. This has the superior version of “Satan, Bite The Dust”. Sorry, Carman.

steve-taylor-squint89 – Squint (Steve Taylor)
…this is a classic. You need to own this, if you don’t. Period. Yeah, I realize I would say this to all of Steve Taylor’s output, but this was the only one of his solo albums released in the 1990s. So, there you go.

crashdog-the-pursuit-of-happiness88 – The Pursuit Of Happiness (Crashdog)
…released at a time when punk was still underground and yet to be made into a joke, this release is legit.

tourniquet-microscopic-view-of-a-telescopic-realm87 – Microscopic View Of A Telescopic Realm (Tourniquet)
…Ted Kirkpatric’s “Tourniquet” goes back to playing “metal”, and the result is adorable. Eh, still better than Crawl To China.

kings-x-dogman86 – Dogman (King’s X)
…very raw, very dark and very angry. My favorite King’s X release. You know, whenever I’m in that kind of mood.

way-sect-bloom-effloresce85 – EfFLoReScE (The Way Sect Bloom)
…something I came across while first exploring the industrial and Gothic side of Christianity. Produced by Celldweller, released on Flaming Fish, and one of the more interesting electronic industrial releases I came across.

scaterd-few-grandmother-spaceship84 – Grandmother’s Spaceship (Scaterd-Few)
…the legendary scaterd-few’s third full-length release I don’t really listen to as much as the first two releases, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s something to overlook, here.

tourniquet-vanishing-lessons83 – Vanishing Lessons (Tourniquet)
…Tourniquet back when they still had a few members of the classic lineup left, plus a new singer and a streamlined sound. Eh, still better than Crawl To China.

holy-soldier-holy-soldier82 – Holy Solider (Holy Soldier)
…some say this self-titled released by Holy Soldier is better than their sophomore release. I disagree. Still a good album.

dig-hey-zoose-strugglefish81 – Struggle Fish (Dig Hay Zoose)
…while I grant that Dig Hay Zoose actually tried to do something unique with their music, rather than just aping a style, this is a delicious hot mess when compared to their second album.

::END TRANSMISSION::

Sing This Corrosion to me…

Leave a comment

One of the more amusing aspects of any Presidential campaign season is watching all of the more notable celebrities make melodramatic threats befitting more for toddlers. Mostly, they threaten to just leave the country if so-and-so gets elected; we all know how well those promises are kept. However, I came across one particular…I’m not even sure if the word “threat” is applicable here, as it doesn’t really fit the pattern.

In a recent interview on the Classic Rock Magazine blog, Sisters Of Mercy frontman Andrew Eldritch, while discussing the recent political climates in both his native UK and here in America, he quipped:

“If Donald Trump actually does become President, that will be reason enough for me to release another album. I don’t think I could keep quiet if that happened.”

So, as you can see, this is not actually your standard passive aggressive ultimatum that comes about during the great clown parade that is the American Presidential elections. As a matter of fact, I would say that this might actually work against any plans to not get Trump elected. Which may actually be a brilliant form of messing with us: “I want a new SoM album, but…I have to vote for Trump to ensure that…”

Wait, I’m beginning to see now. This is one of those Princess & The Tiger situations. [slow clap] Well played, Mister Eldritch. Well played.

::END TRANSMISSION::

Movie Review: RAGAMUFFIN

Leave a comment

1-26 - Movie Review: RAGAMUFFINDuality
2014
PG-13

Ragamuffin is based on the life of Rich Mullins, a musical prodigy who rose to Christian music fame and fortune only to walk away and live on a Navajo reservation. An artistic genius, raised on a tree farm in Indiana by a callous father, Rich wrestled all of his life with the brokenness and crippling insecurity born of his childhood. A lover of Jesus and a rebel in the church, Rich refused to let his struggles with his own darkness tear him away from a God he was determined to love. As he struggled with success in Nashville and depression in Witchita, Rich desired most of all to live a life of honest and reckless faith amidst a culture of religion and conformity.

Well, now. Here’s a rarity: A Christian film that I was actually looking forward to watching. This one being a dramatic biopic of CCM’s favorite hippie, Rich Mullins.

If you’re not familiar with Rich Mullins, he’s the guy who inadvertently wrote all those youth group campfire worship songs you were forced to sing. He was second only to Kieth Green as far as ironically being embraced by CCM culture while actively and vocally despising it himself. And like Keith Green, he too was taken from us tragically at too young an age.

As far as I go, I do have an appreciation of the man’s music. I mean, I happen to be one of those part-time WGWAGs that accompanies the the youth group in singing “Awesome God” ad nausium. Although, I do have a bit of a liking for more of his “screw the Christian Industry” period, as I did actively own A Liturgy, A Legacy, And A Ragamuffin Band at one time. Lost in the shuffle. Haven’t replaced it yet. Waiting for it to come out on vinyl. Carrying on…

Long story short, I was anxious to watch Ragamuffin, not because I’m a big fanboy of his music (I’m not), but more because I’m a fan of what he had to say about his faith and his interaction with other Christians in this world, and more to the point, what he had to say about the Christian culture and industry he found himself in.

After an opening where the movie Rich Mullins is talking on-air with a radio DJ that looked more like Rich Mullins than the actor did (because the DJ was played by Rich’s brother Dave), we go through Rich’s life growing up a farm boy who looked at things a bit differently, much to the chagrin of his old-fashioned father. He then heads off to college, where he meets up with like-minded friends, share a house, and start playing music in various churches and coffee houses. He finds himself pursued by CCM suits due to Amy Grant wanting to record one of the songs he wrote; he’s hesitant at first but then relents and goes to Nashville, where he at first works with Amy Grant, then manages to start a solo career. The response is lukewarm at first, but then he writes “Awesome God” which explodes and becomes his most famous song he never wanted to play live again. The CCM execs want more, but then Rich gets sidetracked by wanting to voluntarily live in poverty teaching music to Navajo children. All the while, he’s wrestling with God and his faith in a world he views as superficial and draining, his depression starting to get the best of him, until he happens upon a copy of The Ragamuffin Gospel. Then he gets into an accident and is killed. The end.

I know, I know, it sounds like I’m doing one of those sarcastic irreverent reviews, but I assure you I am not. As a matter of fact, I would like to say that Ragamuffin was one of those Christian movies that happens to be the exception that proves the rule: This movie did not gloss over things and presented a shiny, happy portrayal of the artist. Neither did the movie seem to over-exaggerate the more controversial aspects to the story for the sake of sensationalism. It did a great job in presenting a man who was a broken servant of Jesus, struggling with his faith in a very real way. There’s a scene here where Rich, in the midst of a depressive swing and crushed with lonliness in Nashville tries to call his parents and his friends, but just misses them as they leave right before the phone rings, and he finally collapses in the phone booth in tears. I actually had to pause the movie more than a couple of times, due to the emotional response this movie had on me. Well played, movie. Well played.

On the other hand, though, I don’t think the movie really captured Rich Mullins’ sense of humor. Mind you, I never met the man and cannot claim to personally know this, but from what I’ve read from people who did know him, that’s the one universal complaint from them: that they didn’t capture Rich’s sense of humor. And I have to admit, much of the time the movie Rich just comes off as more cynical and angst-ridden. And maybe as an unintended contrast to that, the end credits have a video of the real Rich Mullins on stage telling a story which ends in a punchline that had me laughing pretty good.

That said, Ragamuffin is a great movie, it doesn’t gloss over things that I myself have been open about struggling with, and is a movie I think every youth group in America should be forced to watch at least once. Bring the snacks and the tissues.

Book Review: SOUND OF THE BEAST- The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal

Leave a comment

1-20 - Book Review: SOUND OF THE BEAST- The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy MetalIan Christe
!t Books
2003

In this first-ever atlas of the heavy metal phenomenon, Ian Christe delivers a bird’s-eye view of this dark and forbidden music. The ultimate head-banger history, Sound of the Beast reveals tales of concert hysteria, courtroom drama, and musical triumph with: Interviews with Black Sabbath, Metallica, Morbid Angel, Megadeth, Twisted Sister, Kiss, Slipknot, and many others; Genre boxes explaining black metal, power metal, thrash metal, nu metal, and more; More than a hundred rare and unpublished photos; A thirty-year graphic timeline of metal milestones, hilarious metal lists, and the twenty-five most original recordings of all time.

One of the limitations of publishing a book with the phrase “The Complete History Of…” in the title or subtitle is that, given the nature of time itself, it never really is the complete history. Sooner or later, you’re going to have to revise things, and even then, that’s not going to truly be the complete history. Unless the world blows up and society as we know it crumbles at the very moment the update is published, and whatever theoretical alien archaeologist that comes across a somehow preserved copy of it can claim it really is the complete history…

…and once again my brain has hijacked a perfectly good intro to another book review. My apologies, my tender dumplings.

All pedantic speculation aside, being a \,,/METALHEAD\,,/ as well as a general pop culture history junkie, running across a copy of Sound Of The Beast was a rather nice find in that Fremont, Nebraska Hasting’s store that one afternoon several years ago, browsing for nothing in particular, but snatching this up when I saw it there.

As a history of the only music that really matters in life, Sound Of The Beast is one of the better tomes written. It’s written more in a traditionally journalistic style, rather than the coffee table book style; and by that I mean, it’s doesn’t rely on a whole bunch of pictures with the wordy bits put in there scrapbook style. It isn’t a glorified magazine; this is an actual book, giving a well-written detail on the early roots of Metal, and exploring the origins and history of the various differing genres under the great Metal umbrella. Everything is covered here, the good, bad and ugly: Heavy Metal, Pop Metal, Thrash Metal, Death Metal, Black Metal, Hardcore/Crossover, Grindcore, Alternative Metal, Industrial Metal, and all points in between. And yes, there are pictures in here, rather interesting supplemental pictures, as well as side-bars recommending certain albums from the particular sub-genre of the chapter, as well as appendixes. My particular copy that I purchased happens to be one of the updated copies that includes a chapter on metal from the Middle East.

Overall, Sound Of The Beast is perhaps one of the best books published on the wide-covering topic of Heavy Metal I’ve read. This is one I’m going to be keeping in my personal collection for some time. At least, until I can justify upgrading to an “updated” complete history. Highly recommended.

Older Entries