Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: GRAND FUNK RAILROAD

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

grand funk railroadGrand Funk, nee Railroad’s biggest claim to fame–We’re An American Band–includes a shout-out to my part of the proverbial woods: Omaha. Come to think of it, Omaha is mentioned more often than you would think in a lot of rock songs past and present. Pops up in the oddest of places. Anyway, Grand Funk Railroad needs to be in just about every hard rock fan’s collection, simply from the blue collar guitar-driven rock that is about as Americana as you can get without slipping into cheesy “roots rock”. Probably one of the few bands that started as kind of a “hippie rock” group that I can get into, really.

“Got This Thing On The Move”

“Footstompin’ Music”

“We’re An American Band”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Advertisements

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: BOSTON

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

boston logoThe first time I heard Boston was, unfortunately, by way of Top 40 rock radio back when they released their third album, Third Stage, and their lead song “Amanda” was played every fifteen minutes or so it seemed. It was played at ever 7th Grade dance I went to that year, and I was so very not impressed with them because of that bit of power ballad schlock. Which almost made me miss out on hearing the proper hard rocking that these guys were better known for in the 1970s, when I heard “More Than A Feeling” on a 70s Rock compilation tape I got from a truck stop in the summer of 1990. The first two albums are hard rock classics, and unlike anything then or since.

“More Than A Feeling”

“Smokin'”

“Don’t Look Back”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: TED NUGENT

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

ted nugent logoAnother hard rocker from Detroit, Ted Nugent is called the Motor City Madman for a reason. Taking a manic approach to guitar playing, his music has this uncanny ability to make hair grow on your chest (regardless of gender) and your testicles drop (probably more gender-specific, but I’m not completely certain of that one) just listening to it. My first taste of Uncle Ted’s music was by way of the live album Double Live Gonzo, given to me by my uncle after discovering me listening to the likes of Wham!. Nugent has been a staple of my listening habits since.

“Stranglehold”

“Free-For-All”

“Cat Scratch Fever”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: AEROSMITH

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

big-aerosmith-logo-Mjc0Mg==

Of course Aerosmith would be on this month’s list. Good old fashioned bluesy American hard rock straight out of Boston, Aerosmith had the swagger, the attitude, and the dedication to really become more than just another bar band out of Bean Town. Sure, they’re a rock band, and they may have had more misses than hits in the hard rock category in the later years of their existence, but popping on some of their classic tunes still gets the head bopping along with some of the smokiest riffs ever offered up in the 1970s, and even in the 1980s during their resurgence. But it’s their classic catalog that really holds up after all this time, really.

“Mama Kin”

“Train Kept A-Rollin'”

“Toys In The Attic”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: ALICE COOPER (Band)

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

Alice-Cooper-Billion-Dollar-Ba-128358

KISS may be credited for pioneering theatrics in the metal genre, but it was the Alice Cooper Band that really brought the spectacle to rock and roll. Like a Hammer Horror all done up in vaudeville, Alice Cooper the band pretty much embodied shock rock and ran with it, inspiring metal bands since with how to really put on a show.

“I’m Eighteen”

“School’s Out”

“Billion Dollar Babies”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: BLACK SABBATH

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

black sabbath logo

So…again with the six song picks, instead of the usual three. As with AC/DC, it would be a shame to just limit three picks to just one era or so, or even pick just one from the Ozzy/Dio/miscellaneous┬ávocalist versions of Black Sabbath. And instead of picking three from each different versions of the band, making the count nine, I just stuck with three from the Ozzy era and the Dio era. Because I’m rather unfamiliar with the Misc. Singer albums, and neither do I really want to be. Maybe I’m missing out on something fantastic by doing so, but something tells me I’m not. Besides…OZZY AND DIO!

Anyway, if you claim to be a METALHEAD and don’t know who Black Sabbath is, you deserve all the poser taunts and kidney punches you’re going to endure. Everything that METAL is, Black Sabbath created, or at least pioneered beyond the limitations from before. Some of which were by sheer accident. That deep, dark sludgy guitar sound, full of power chord riffs that everybody’s copied since? Machine press accident. The self-titled album should be issued, along with the follow-up Paranoid, as part as a Welcome Kit whenever someone decides to become a METALHEAD, as all the basic foundations of METAL are found in those two classics. Even as they ventured into more proper metal territory when Ronnie James Dio took over vocal duties, they remained innovators rather than imitators.

Ozzy Era:
“Black Sabbath”

“Paranoid”

“Children Of The Grave”

Dio Era:
“Heaven And Hell”

“The Sign Of The Southern Cross”

“After All (The Dead)”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Hard Rock + Proto-Metal FEBRUARY: Led Zeppelin

Leave a comment

YEAR OF METAL title

led zeppelin

Many a time, when talking about classic heavy metal and the bands that formed the genre, sooner or later Led Zeppelin is going to be brought up. And yeah, their influence is a valid one; though, one could very well argue that they were really more of a blues rock band that had a bit more of an attitude than the era they initially sprung up from. As a matter of fact, Led Zeppelin rocked just as much with acoustic instruments as they did with the patented “wall of guitars” production job that they pioneered. Matter of fact, there’s only one heavy song on their third record, with the rest being acoustic numbers. To say nothing of classical instrumentation, or experimenting with other styles all together. Regardless, Led Zeppelin’s contribution to metal was taking the roots of all rock-based music–the blues–and infused it with a strong dose of power and more than a generous helping of mysteriousness and fantasy.

“Dazed And Confused”

“Heartbreaker”

“Immigrant Song”

::END TRANSMISSION::

Older Entries